BANGLADEAFY: Decibel Magazine Premieres “Lifeforms” From NYC Avant-Metal Duo; Housefly Album Nears September Release Through Nefarious Industries

New York City hyper-avant metal duo BANGLADEAFY presents the new single “Lifeforms,” as the release of their new Housefly full-length grows ever closer through Nefarious Industries. Decibel Magazine is hosting the exclusive advance stream of the new track. Marking a development in the band’s philosophy and approach to songwriting, particularly in the vocal department, Housefly embraces more personal lyricism and an uncharacteristically up-front vocal presence.

In 2020, BANGLADEAFY have freed themselves of all expectation and restraint – now, anything goes. With the drums recorded and mixed by Mike Gatto of Gatto Records, Housefly was engineered, mixed, and mastered by Jonathan Vergara of Pancake Studios, and completed with artwork by Bryan Elkins. With the “Lifeforms” premiere, BANGLADEAFY‘s Jon Ehlers reveals, “Musically, this song was an experiment in chromatic movements. I was trying to compose a Shepard tone type thing but ended up with something different. Lyrically, this song addresses the notion about our existence being a phenomenon in our immediate universe. Yet, we’re dismantling our own natural existence despite being provided the tools to be fantastic life forms. We have more control over our fate than we give ourselves credit for, but we continue on this path of self-destruction. Let it motivate or discourage you.” Decibel writes, “Check out ‘Lifeforms,’ a new track from Housefly that filters the band’s ear for riffy, off-the-wall compositions through Skinny Puppy, Nine Inch Nails, and Devo. It has both a cinematic and tribal feeling…” 

Hear BANGLADEAFY’s “Lifeforms” early via Decibel Magazine at THIS LOCATION.

Nefarious Industries will release Housefly on all digital platforms on September 18th. Find preorders at the label shop HERE and Bandcamp where “Harvest” is playing HERE. 

The limitless and ever-evolving duo BANGLADEAFY – drummer Atif Haq and bassist/pianist/vocalist Jon Ehlers – comes slamming back with a new beast. Housefly brings you thirteen anxiety-ridden compositions performed live on hardware synths, sample pads, and acoustic drums, and entirely abandons the electric bass acrobatics the tag team has become known for. Inspired by the human manipulation of electronic sounds, Housefly sees BANGLADEAFY revisiting influences of their youth such as Skinny Puppy, Nine Inch Nails, and Devo. 

Watch for several official videos and more on BANGLADEAFY‘s Housefly to be issued over the weeks ahead.

SPOOK THE HORSES: Empty Body Full-Length From New Zealand Post-Metal Unit Out NOW And Streaming Via Pelagic Records

Empty Body, the crushing new full-length from Wellington, New Zealand-based post-metal unit SPOOK THE HORSES is out now via Pelagic Records.  Following the calm and sublime People Used To Live HereEmpty Body rears its head with distortion levels cranked up, tempos sped up, and songs condensed and stripped down to the bare, ugly essentials. Indeed, Empty Body comes as a brutal wake-up call within the rampant COVID-19 fatigue and an unexpected surprise in almost every regard. “We’ve always been both a heavy and a quiet band. An entire album of our prettier, more bittersweet inclinations demands a reply of our most aggressive and confrontational. The pendulum must swing back the other way,” comments multi-instrumentalist Callum Gay. Stream Empty Body at THIS LOCATION.

View the band’s previously released videos for “Inheritance” and “Cell Death” HERE.Empty Body is available on CD, LP, and digital formats HERE. Fans of Breach, Cult Of Luna, Converge, Trap Them, Old Man Gloom, and Baptists, pay heed.  Imagine a band where members can rotate between instruments, because every band member can play every instrument. SPOOK THE HORSES are such a band. And it is perhaps this multi-instrumentalism and virtuosity that explains the vast musical territory that is explored across the band’s four albums. While 2011’s debut album Brighter was defined by sweet post-rock crescendos, 2015’s Rainmaker was a much heavier affair. People Used To Live Here (2017) created an atmosphere of quiet desolation, raw and real, desperate and unsettling: the post-apocalyptic soundtrack to abandoned places, where people used to live, at one point in time, long ago.”Since we started work on People Used To Live Here years ago we knew the album would need a follow-up that was radically different – almost spitefully different – if only to utterly refuse any trite suggestion that we might be “maturing” or mellowing out with time,” Gay explains. “We’d written the song ‘Self Destroyer’ (off Empty Body) somehow concurrently with the early People Used To Live Heredemos and it had a sense of momentum to it that immediately engaged us. Once that energy was there it was an obvious choice for the next record, compressing our intuitive emotive peaks into raw forward motion. We all wrote collectively with the new focus in mind.”